04 Nov NAEP results show CCSD achievement comparable to other large districts

The release of state and nationwide results of the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) test, otherwise known as “the nation’s report card,” shows that students in the Clark County School District (CCSD) are performing at a comparable level or outperforming their counterparts in the nation’s large urban school districts.

The 2018-19 school year is the second year CCSD has participated in the NAEP Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA). It allows CCSD to compare itself to 27 other large urban school districts that serve similar student populations.

2019 Achievements

The 2019 results show that CCSD’s performance is comparable to, or exceeds, other large urban school districts:

● CCSD scored the same or higher than 80.8% of large districts in Grade 4 Reading
o 63% of CCSD students scored at basic or above in Grade 4 Reading
● CCSD scored the same or higher than 84.6% of large districts in Grade 8 Reading
o 66% of CCSD students scored at basic or above in Grade 8 Reading
● CCSD scored the same or higher than 76.9% of other large districts in Grade 4 Math
o 76% of CCSD students scored at basic or above in Grade 4 Math
● CCSD scored the same or higher than 69.2% in large districts in Grade 8 Math
o 59% of CCSD students scored at basic or above in Grade 8 Math

“It is encouraging that we are trending in the right direction on behalf of our children,” said CCSD Superintendent Dr. Jesus F. Jara. “This is another indicator of our progress with student achievement, but we have much work to accomplish. I am very proud of the dedication of our teachers, support professionals and administrators who are focusing on the District’s core value
of student success.”

Trend Data

This is the first year that trend data is specific to CCSD because the District has only participated in NAEP TUDA since the 2016-17 school year. The data from this assessment will allow the District to show how CCSD is performing over time, while also comparing results with other participating districts. The results show:

Grade 4 Reading
● CCSD slightly improved the average score in Grade 4 Reading while the nation saw a decline in Grade 4 Reading.

Grade 4 Math
● CCSD saw an improved score in the average score for Grade 4 Math.

Grade 8 Reading
● CCSD kept with national trends and saw a slight decline in Grade 8 Reading.

Grade 8 Math
● CCSD stayed steady in Grade 8 Math while the nation saw a decline in Grade 8 Math.

Subgroup Achievements
Additionally, subgroups of minority students and students eligible for Free and Reduced Price Lunch (FRL), a measure of low income, demonstrated notable gains:

Grade 4 Reading
● The average scale score for Hispanic students significantly increased from 206 to 212.
● The average scale score for students who are eligible for FRL significantly increased from 206 to 211. This increase also narrowed the gap between those eligible for FRL and those who are not to 22 points from 30 points.
● Gains were also seen in the average scale score for English Language Learner (ELL) students from 178 to 196.
o These gains are also reflected in the increase in proficient students.
o In 2017, 80% of ELL students in Grade 4 scored as Below Basic. Now, 61% of ELL students scored Below Basic.

Grade 4 Math
● The average scale score for Hispanic students significantly increased from 225 to 231.
● Students eligible for FRL significantly increased from 225 to 230.
● ELL students improved their average scale score from 206 to 219. This is also reflected in the increase in proficient students. In 2017, 59% of ELL students scored as Below Basic. This year, 40% of students scored as Below Basic.

Grade 8 Math
● The gap between students who are eligible for FRL and students ineligible, significantly decreased to 23 points from 30 points.

Nationally, the new data shows that several large urban school districts are at or above national averages. In their recent news release, the Council of Great City Schools, an organization of the nation’s largest urban school systems whose primary goal is to provide the greatest public education possible, commented on the important progress made by large urban school districts.

“We have made significant progress over the years in both reading and math and we have dramatically narrowed the gap with the nation,” said Michael Casserly, executive director of the Council of Great City Schools. “We have still more to do, but the era of the poor performance in our nation’s urban public-school systems has ended, and it has been replaced by results,
accountability, and promise.”

NAEP is a nationwide assessment system developed and administered by the U.S. Department of Education since 1969. Congress established NAEP to provide a longitudinal measure for evaluating what American students know and are able to do in various subject areas. Only Grades 4 and 8 were assessed during the 2019 administration.

To learn more about the Clark County School District, visit ccsd.net.